Practitioners of the Dhamma are Tops

As I was “walking with Chah” my favorite Dhamma talk, pretty much out of any dhamma talk i’ve ever listened to, came up, and two points from it I wanted to share. The first is about practitioners :
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There’s no suffering like the suffering of a Dhamma cultivator and there’s no happiness like the happiness of one either. There’s no zeal to compare with the zeal of the cultivator and there’s no laziness to compare with them either. Practicers of the Dhamma are tops. That’s why I say if you really practice it’s a sight to see.
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This I fully agree with, which is why I love to be around people earnestly trying to live this practice. now the Second :
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It’s just like a farmer who hasn’t yet finished his fields. Every year he plants rice but this year he still hasn’t gotten it finished, so his mind is stuck on that, he can’t rest content. His work is still unfinished. Even when he’s with friends he can’t relax, he’s all the time nagged by his unfinished business. Or like a mother who leaves her baby upstairs in the house while she goes to feed the animals below: she’s always got her baby in mind, lest it should fall from the house. Even though she may do other things, her baby is never far from her thoughts.
It’s just the same for us and our practice – we never forget it. Even though we may do other things our practice is never far from our thoughts, it’s constantly with us, day and night. It has to be like this if you are really going to make progress.
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Lately in my talks I’ve been gradually forming a coherent set of words to convey a meaning I’m trying to put forth, and as usual Ajahn Chah puts it so simply.
This was in relation to when I explain how when the practice becomes not just something you do, but who you are, part of your life, it’s always there with you, even if you are in the midst of all kinds of activities, because you have built it up as a habit to such an extent that even when you are not thinking about being mindful, your mindfulness can arise on it’s own accord due to you setting the groundwork for the causes and conditions of it’s arising.
Just as a mother puts her baby down and is doing other activities, the baby is not far from her thoughts, so too a practitioner who has become the practice, never forgets it and it is never far from their thoughts, as they strive to apply the practice skillfully in all aspects of their life.This is when, as I’ve said(and Chah says above) the practice really takes off.
this is reminiscent(and I don’t think by coincidence) to the Buddha using the example in the metta sutta, that one should protect their mindstate of metta like a mother protects their only child.
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Bhante Analayo : Understanding Views Other Then Our Own

This is an important thing to consider, especially in the current cultural climate :

“It’s a real feedback on our mindfulness practice also. We can tell if somebody’s mindfulness practice is working correctly when we see that he or she is getting less attached to views. This doesn’t mean not having any opinions or being utterly indecisive or unsure. It means that you can very clearly formulate your ideas and views, but you don’t hold on to them tightly. The open awareness that you have is then able to understand the other side. Somebody who is diametrically opposed to your views – you understand why he or she is saying that. You may even be able to appreciate the logic and coherence of their thinking. So beautiful. So powerful. And this is all because the hedonic investment in your views and opinions is something that you are consciously monitoring through awareness.”

We’re trying to be very inclusive – receptive and open. To allow for others to be different. To allow for racial differences, gender differences, differences in interest – allow people to be the way they are. That doesn’t mean that I have to be like them, but it does mean that there can be space for others to be the way they are. That’s the way out of discrimination, out of fundamentalism, out of dogmatism, and out of so many other evils. Very spacious and allowing, but at the same time also very clear and discerning. The two come together in that quality of being aware.

I can allow myself to step out of my position, put myself into your position, and look at the situation from your viewpoint. So fascinating. And that doesn’t mean that afterwards I can’t go back to my viewpoint – that I have somehow lost it for good just because for a moment I let go of it to explore the other position. I can still have my opinion, but I will also have a greater understanding of the whole situation. I now understand the situation from the opposite viewpoint. If I’m just holding on to my viewpoint, I’ll get a sort of tunnel view, like I’m wearing those blinders they put on horses, and everything that is different from my view has to be out – cut off. Not allowed.

– Bhante Analayo

Dhamma to Inspire” : The Buddha’s Words for Monastics : Vol V

117 (7) Guarding

“Bhikkhus, one bent on his own welfare798 should practice heedfulness, mindfulness, and guarding of the mind in four instances. What four? (1) “‘May my mind not become excited by things that provoke lust!’ One bent on his own welfare should practice heedfulness, mindfulness, and guarding of the mind thus.

(2) “‘May my mind not be full of hate toward things that provoke hatred!’One bent on his own welfare should practice heedfulness, mindfulness, and guarding of the mind thus.

(3) “‘May my mind not be deluded by things that cause delusion!’One bent on his own welfare should practice heedfulness, mindfulness, and guarding of the mind thus.

(4) “‘May my mind not be intoxicated by things that intoxicate!’799 One bent on his own welfare should practice heedfulness, mindfulness, and guarding of the mind thus.

“Bhikkhus, when a bhikkhu’s mind is not excited by things that provoke lust because he has gotten rid of lust; when his mind is not full of hate toward things that provoke hatred because he has gotten rid of hatred; when his mind is not deluded by things that cause delusion because he has gotten rid of delusion; when his mind is not intoxicated by things that intoxicate because he has gotten rid of intoxication, then he does not cower, does not shake, does not tremble or become terrified, nor is he swayed by the words of [other]

 




 
122 (2) Waves

(2)“And what is the peril of crocodiles? Here, a clansman has gone forth out of faith from the household life into homelessness with the thought: ‘I am immersed in birth, old age, and death; in sorrow, lamentation, pain, dejection, and anguish. I am immersed in suffering, afflicted by suffering. Perhaps an ending of this entire mass of suffering can be attained.’

Then, after he has thus gone forth, his fellow monks exhort and instruct him: ‘You may consume this but not that; you may eat this but not that; 807 you may taste this but not that; you may drink this but not that. You can consume, eat, taste, and drink what is allowable, not what is unallowable. You may consume, eat, taste, and drink within the proper time, not outside the proper time.’He thinks: ‘Formerly, when I was a layman, I consumed whatever I wanted to consume and did not consume anything I did not wish to consume. I ate whatever I wanted to eat and did not eat anything I did not wish to eat. I tasted whatever I wanted to taste and did not taste anything I did not wish to taste. I drank whatever I wanted to drink and did not drink anything I did not wish to drink. I consumed, ate, tasted, and drank both what was allowable and what was not allowable. I consumed, ate, tasted, and drank both within the proper time and outside the proper time. [125] But now when faithful householders give us delicious things to consume and eat during the day outside the proper time, these [monks] seem to put a gag over our mouths.’Being angry and displeased, he gives up the training and reverts to the lower life. This is called a bhikkhu who has given up the training and reverted to the lower life because of the peril of crocodiles. ‘The peril of crocodiles’is a designation for gluttony. This is called the peril of crocodiles.

(3) “And what is the peril of whirlpools? Here, a clansman has gone forth out of faith from the household life into homelessness with the thought: ‘I am immersed in birth, old age, and death; in sorrow, lamentation, pain, dejection, and anguish. I am immersed in suffering, afflicted by suffering. Perhaps an ending of this entire mass of suffering can be attained.’Then, after he has thus gone forth, in the morning he dresses, takes his bowl and robe, and enters a village or town for alms, with body, speech, and mind unguarded, without having established mindfulness, his sense faculties unrestrained. He sees a householder or a householder’s son there enjoying himself, furnished and endowed with the five objects of sensual pleasure. It occurs to him: ‘Formerly, when I was a layman, I enjoyed myself, furnished and endowed with the five objects of sensual pleasure. My family has wealth. I can both enjoy that wealth and do meritorious deeds. Let me now give up the training and revert to the lower life so that I can both enjoy that wealth and do meritorious deeds.’So he gives up the training and reverts to the lower life. This is called a bhikkhu who has given up the training and reverted to the lower life because of the peril of whirlpools. ‘The peril of whirlpools’is a designation for the five objects of sensual pleasure. This is called the peril of whirlpools.

 




 
“There are , bhikkhus, these four illnesses incurred by a monk. What four? (1) Here, a bhikkhu has strong desires, undergoes distress, and is not content with any kind of robe, almsfood, lodging, or medicines and provisions for the sick. 840 (2) Because he has strong desires, undergoes distress, and is not content with any kind of robe, almsfood, lodging , and medicines and provisions for the sick, he submits to evil desire for recognition and for gain, honor, and praise. (3) He arouses himself, strives, and makes an effort to obtain recognition and gain, honor, and praise.

“Therefore, bhikkhus, you should train yourselves thus: ‘We will not have strong desires or undergo distress, and we will not be discontent with any kind of robe, almsfood , lodging, and medicines and provisions for the sick. We will not submit to evil desires

 




 
“Friends, any bhikkhu or bhikkhunī who observes four things inwardly can come to the conclusion: ‘I am not declining in wholesome qualities. This is called non-decline by the Blessed One.’ What four? The diminishing of lust, the diminishing of hatred, the diminishing of delusion, and his wisdom eye treads in the deep matters of what is possible and impossible. Any bhikkhu or bhikkhunī who observes these four things inwardly can come to the conclusion: ‘I am not declining in wholesome qualities. This is called non-decline by the Blessed One.’”

 




 
(4) “Again, the elder bhikkhus are not luxurious and lax, but they discard backsliding and take the lead in solitude; they arouse energy for the attainment of the as-yet-unattained, for the achievement of the as-yet-unachieved, for the realization of the as-yet-unrealized. [Those in] the next generation follow their example. They, too, do not become luxurious and lax, but they discard backsliding and take the lead in solitude; they, too, arouse energy for the attainment of the as-yet -unattained, for the achievement of the as-yet-unachieved, for the realization of the as-yet-unrealized. This is the fourth thing that leads to the continuation, non-decline, and non-disappearance of the good Dhamma. [149]

 




 
(1) “And what, bhikkhus, is practice that is painful with sluggish direct knowledge? Here, a bhikkhu dwells contemplating the unattractiveness of the body, perceiving the repulsiveness of food, perceiving non-delight in the entire world, contemplating impermanence in all conditioned phenomena; and he has the perception of death well established internally. He dwells depending upon these five trainee powers: the power of faith, the power of moral shame, the power of moral dread, [151] the power of energy, and the power of wisdom. 852 These five faculties arise in him feebly: the faculty of faith, the faculty of energy, the faculty of mindfulness, the faculty of concentration, and the faculty of wisdom. Because these five faculties are feeble, he sluggishly attains the immediacy condition for the destruction of the taints. This is called practice that is painful with sluggish direct knowledge.

(4) “And what is practice that is pleasant with quick direct knowledge? Here, secluded from sensual pleasures, secluded from unwholesome states, a bhikkhu enters and dwells in the first jhāna …the second jhāna …the third jhāna …[152] the fourth jhāna. He dwells depending upon these five trainee powers: the power of faith …the power of wisdom. These five faculties arise in him prominently: the faculty of faith …the faculty of wisdom. Because these five faculties are prominent, he quickly attains the immediacy condition for the destruction of the taints. This is called practice that is pleasant with quick direct knowledge. “These, bhikkhus, are the four modes of practice.”

(4) “The mode of practice that is pleasant with quick direct knowledge is declared to be superior for both reasons: because practice is pleasant and because direct knowledge is quick. This mode of practice is declared to be superior for both reasons. “These, bhikkhus, are the four modes of practice.

 




 
(1) “I do not say, brahmin, that everything seen should be spoken about, nor do I say that nothing seen should be spoken about. (2) I do not say that everything heard should be spoken about, nor do I say that nothing heard [173] should be spoken about. (3) I do not say that everything sensed should be spoken about, nor do I say that nothing sensed should be spoken about. (4) I do not say that everything cognized should be spoken about, nor do I say that nothing cognized should be spoken about. (1) “For, brahmin, if, when one speaks about what one has seen, unwholesome qualities increase and wholesome qualities decline, I say that one should not speak about what one has seen. But if, when one speaks about what one has seen, unwholesome qualities decline and wholesome qualities increase.

 




 
244 (2) Offenses

“Bhikkhus, there are these four perils of offenses. What four? (1) “Suppose, bhikkhus, they were to arrest a thief, a criminal, and show him to the king, saying: ‘Your majesty, this is a thief, a criminal. Let your majesty impose a penalty on him.’The king would say to them: [241] ‘Go, sirs, and tie this man’s arms tightly behind his back with a strong rope, shave his head, and lead him around from street to street, from square to square, to the ominous beating of a drum. Then take him out through the south gate and behead him south of the city.’The king’s men would do as instructed and behead that man south of the city.

A man standing on the sidelines might think: ‘Truly, this man must have committed an evil deed, reprehensible, punishable by beheading, insofar as the king’s men tied his arms tightly behind his back with a strong rope …and beheaded him south of the city. Indeed, I should never do such an evil deed, reprehensible, punishable by beheading.’“So too, when a bhikkhu or bhikkhunī has set up such a keen perception of peril in regard to the pārājika offenses, it can be expected that one who has never yet committed a pārājika offense will not commit one; and one who has committed such an offense will make amends for it in accordance with the Dhamma. 949

(2) “Suppose, bhikkhus, a man were to wrap himself in a black cloth, loosen his hair, put a club on his shoulder, and tell a large crowd of people: ‘Worthy sirs, 950 I have committed an evil deed, reprehensible, punishable by clubbing. Let me do whatever will make you pleased with me.’A man standing on the sidelines might think: ‘Truly, this man must have committed an evil deed, reprehensible, punishable by clubbing, insofar as he has wrapped himself in a black cloth, loosened his hair, put a club on his shoulder, and tells a large crowd of people: “Worthy sirs, I have committed an evil deed, reprehensible, deserving a clubbing. Let me do whatever will make you pleased with me.”[242] Indeed, I should never do such an evil deed, reprehensible, punishable by clubbing.’“So too, when a bhikkhu or bhikkhunī has set up such a keen perception of peril in regard to the saṅghādisesa offenses, it can be expected that one who has never yet committed a saṅghādisesa offense will not commit one, and one who has committed such an offense will make amends for it in accordance with the Dhamma. 951

(3) “Suppose, bhikkhus, a man were to wrap himself in a black cloth, loosen his hair, put a sack of ashes on his shoulder, and tell a large crowd of people: ‘Worthy sirs, I have committed an evil deed, reprehensible, punishable by a sack of ashes. 952 Let me do whatever will make you pleased with me.’A man standing on the sidelines might think: ‘Truly, this man must have committed an evil deed, reprehensible, punishable by a sack of ashes, insofar as he has wrapped himself in a black cloth, loosened his hair, put a sack of ashes on his shoulder, and tells a large crowd of people: “Worthy sirs, I have committed an evil deed, reprehensible, punishable by a sack of ashes. Let me do whatever will make you pleased with me.”Indeed, I should never do such an evil deed, reprehensible, [to be punished with] a sack of ashes.’“So too, when a bhikkhu or bhikkhunī has set up such a keen perception of peril in regard to the pācittiya offenses, it can be expected that one who has never yet committed a pācittiya offense will not commit one, and one who has committed such an offense will make amends for it in accordance with the Dhamma. 953

(4) “Suppose, bhikkhus, a man were to wrap himself in a black cloth, loosen his hair, and tell a large crowd of people: ‘Worthy sirs, I have committed an evil deed, reprehensible, censurable. Let me do whatever will make you pleased with me.’A man standing on the sidelines might think: ‘Truly, this man must have committed an evil deed, reprehensible, censurable, insofar as he has wrapped himself in a black cloth, loosened his hair, and tells a large crowd of people: [243] “Worthy sirs, I have committed an evil deed, reprehensible, censurable. Let me do whatever will make you pleased with me.”Indeed, I should never do such an evil deed, reprehensible, censurable.’“So too, when a bhikkhu or bhikkhunī has set up such a keen perception of peril in regard to the pāṭidesanīya offenses, it can be expected that one who has never yet committed a pāṭidesanīya offense will not commit one, and one who has committed such an offense will make amends for it in accordance with the Dhamma. 954 “These, bhikkhus, are the four perils of offenses.”

 




 
24 (4) Immoral

“Bhikkhus, (1) for an immoral person, for one deficient in virtuous behavior, (2) right concentration lacks its proximate cause. When there is no right concentration, for one deficient in right concentration, (3) the knowledge and vision of things as they really are lacks its proximate cause. When there is no knowledge and vision of things as they really are, for one deficient in the knowledge and vision of things as they really are, (4) disenchantment and dispassion lack their proximate cause. When there is no disenchantment and dispassion, for one deficient in disenchantment and dispassion, (5) the knowledge and vision of liberation lacks its proximate cause. 987

“Suppose there is a tree deficient in branches and foliage. Then its shoots do not grow to fullness; also its bark, [20] softwood, and heartwood do not grow to fullness. So too, for an immoral person, one deficient in virtuous behavior, right concentration lacks its proximate cause. When there is no right concentration … the knowledge and vision of liberation lacks its proximate cause.

 




 
An. 5.30
“Let me never come upon fame, Nāgita, and may fame never catch up with me. One who does not gain at will, without trouble or difficulty, this bliss of renunciation, bliss of solitude, bliss of peace, bliss of enlightenment that I gain at will, without trouble or difficulty, might accept that vile pleasure, that slothful pleasure, the pleasure of gain, honor, and praise.”

(1) “Nāgita, what is eaten, drunk, consumed, and tasted winds up as feces and urine: this is its outcome. (2) From the change and alteration of things that are dear arise sorrow, lamentation, pain, dejection, and anguish: this is its outcome. (3) For one devoted to practicing meditation on the mark of unattractiveness, revulsion toward the mark of the beautiful becomes established: this is its outcome. (4) For one who dwells contemplating impermanence in the six bases for contact, revulsion toward contact becomes established: this is its outcome. (5) For one who dwells contemplating arising and vanishing in the five aggregates subject to clinging, revulsion toward clinging becomes established: this is its outcome.

 




 

In the same way, monks, when association with worthy people prevails, listening to the True Teaching will prevail. When listening to the True Teaching prevails, faith will prevail. When faith prevails, wise attention will prevail. When wise attention prevails, mindfulness and clear comprehension will prevail. When mindfulness and clear comprehension prevail, sense-control will prevail. When sense-control prevails, the three ways of good conduct will prevail. When the three ways of good conduct prevail, the four establishings of mindfulness will prevail. When the four establishings of mindfulness prevail, the seven factors of enlightenment will prevail. When the seven factors of enlightenment prevail, liberation by supreme knowledge will prevail. Such is the nutriment of that liberation by supreme knowledge and so it prevails.

AN 10.61




 
(5) “Here, a bhikkhu learns the Dhamma— the discourses, mixed prose and verse, expositions, verses, inspired utterances, quotations, birth stories, amazing accounts, and questions-and-answers— but he goes further and understands its meaning with wisdom. It is in this way that a bhikkhu is one who dwells in the Dhamma.

 




 
5.75-76
76 (6) Warriors (2)

“Bhikkhus, there are these five kinds of warriors found in the world. What five? (1) “Here, some warrior takes up a sword and shield, [94] arms himself with a bow and quiver, and enters the fray of battle. He strives and exerts himself in the battle, but his foes slay him and finish him off. There is, bhikkhus, such a warrior here. This is the first kind of warrior found in the world.

Enjoy the spiritual life. Do not think you are unable to follow the training, give it up, and revert to the lower life.’ While he is being exhorted and instructed by his fellow monks in this way, he says: ‘I will try, friends, I will carry on, I will enjoy it. I won’t think I am unable to follow the training, give it up, and revert to the lower life.’ This person, I say, is just like the warrior who takes up a sword and shield, arms himself with a bow and quiver, and enters the fray of battle, who is wounded by his foes while he strives and exerts himself in the battle, and is then carried off and brought to his relatives, who nurse him and look after him,

 




 
77 (7) Future Perils

(1) “Bhikkhus, when a forest bhikkhu considers five future perils, it is enough for him to dwell heedful, ardent, [101] and resolute for the attainment of the as-yet-unattained, for the achievement of the as-yet-unachieved, for the realization of the as-yet-unrealized. What five?

‘I am now dwelling all alone in the forest. But while I am living here , a snake might bite me, a scorpion might sting me, or a centipede might sting me. Because of that I might die, which would be an obstacle for me.

‘I am now dwelling all alone in the forest. But while I am living here, I might trip and fall down, or the food that I have eaten might harm me, or my bile or phlegm or sharp winds might become agitated in me. Because of that I might die, which would be an obstacle for me.

‘I am now dwelling all alone in the forest. But while I am living here, I might encounter wild beasts, such as a lion, a tiger, a leopard, a bear, or a hyena, and they might take my life. Because of that I would die, [102] which would be an obstacle for me.

But while I am living here, I might encounter hoodlums escaping a crime or planning one and they might take my life. Because of that I would die…
But in the forest there are wild spirits, 1082 and they might take my life. Because of that I would die, which would be an obstacle for me. Let me now arouse energy for the attainment of the as-yet -unattained,

New Retreat – The Noble Eightfold Path : Ancient Teachings for a Modern World

I will be doing a retreat in November once more at Buddhist Insights in NYC. The Title of this event is :

*The Noble Eightfold Path : Ancient Teachings for a Modern World*

I want this to be more then just a basic Noble Eightfold Path retreat. I will go over the various aspects of the path, but with a special focus on how you can implement the path in this modern world, and how the path is timeless and as viable today as it was 2600 years ago.

sign up here : https://www.eventbrite.com/e/weekend-retreat-the-noble-eightfold-path-with-bhikkhu-jayasara-tickets-38420363341

Dhamma to Inspire” : The Buddha’s Words for Monastics : Vol III

16 (6) The Unmistaken

“Bhikkhus, possessing three qualities, a bhikkhu is practicing the unmistaken way and has laid the groundwork for the destruction of the taints. 352 What three?

Here, a bhikkhu guards the doors of the sense faculties, observes moderation in eating, and is intent on wakefulness. 353 (1) “And how, bhikkhus, does a bhikkhu guard the doors of the sense faculties? Here, having seen a form with the eye, a bhikkhu does not grasp its marks and features. Since, if he left the eye faculty unrestrained, bad unwholesome states of longing and dejection might invade him, he practices restraint over it; he guards the eye faculty, he undertakes the restraint of the eye faculty.

Having heard a sound with the ear …Having smelled an odor with the nose …Having tasted a taste with the tongue …Having felt a tactile object with the body …Having cognized a mental phenomenon with the mind, a bhikkhu does not grasp its marks and features. Since, if he left the mind faculty unrestrained, bad unwholesome states of longing and dejection might invade him, he practices restraint over it; he guards the mind faculty, he undertakes the restraint of the mind faculty. It is in this way that a bhikkhu guards the doors of the sense faculties. [114]

(2) “And how does a bhikkhu observe moderation in eating? Here, reflecting carefully, a bhikkhu consumes food neither for amusement nor for intoxication nor for the sake of physical beauty and attractiveness, but only for the support and maintenance of this body, for avoiding harm, and for assisting the spiritual life, considering: ‘Thus I shall terminate the old feeling and not arouse a new feeling, and I shall be healthy and blameless and dwell at ease.’It is in this way that a bhikkhu observes moderation in eating.

(3) “And how is a bhikkhu intent on wakefulness? Here, during the day, while walking back and forth and sitting, a bhikkhu purifies his mind of obstructive qualities. In the first watch of the night, while walking back and forth and sitting, he purifies his mind of obstructive qualities. In the middle watch of the night he lies down on the right side in the lion’s posture, with one foot overlapping the other, mindful and clearly comprehending, after noting in his mind the idea of rising. After rising, in the last watch of the night, while walking back and forth and sitting, he purifies his mind of obstructive qualities. It is in this way that a bhikkhu is intent on wakefulness. “A bhikkhu who possesses these three qualities is practicing the unmistaken way and has laid the groundwork for the destruction of the taints.”

 




 

“So too, possessing three factors, a bhikkhu is incapable of achieving a wholesome state not yet attained or of increasing a wholesome state already attained. What three? Here, a bhikkhu does not diligently apply himself to an object of concentration in the morning, in the middle of the day, or in the evening. Possessing these three factors, a bhikkhu is incapable of achieving a wholesome state not yet attained or of increasing a wholesome state already attained. [116]

“Bhikkhus, possessing three factors, a shopkeeper is capable of acquiring wealth not yet acquired and of increasing wealth already acquired. What three? Here, a shopkeeper diligently applies himself to his work in the morning, in the middle of the day, and in the evening. Possessing these three factors, a shopkeeper is capable of acquiring wealth not yet acquired and of increasing wealth already acquired. “So too, possessing three factors, a bhikkhu is capable of achieving a wholesome state not yet attained and of increasing a wholesome state already attained. What three? Here, a bhikkhu diligently applies himself to an object of concentration in the morning, in the middle of the day, and in the evening. Possessing these three factors, a bhikkhu is capable of achieving a wholesome state not yet attained and of increasing a wholesome state already attained.”

 




 

(1) “And what, bhikkhus, is oneself as one’s authority? Here, having gone to the forest, to the foot of a tree, or to an empty hut, a bhikkhu reflects thus: ‘I did not go forth from the household life into homelessness for the sake of a robe, almsfood, or lodging, or for the sake of becoming this or that, 399 but rather [with the thought]: “I am immersed in birth, old age, and death; in sorrow, lamentation, pain, dejection, and anguish. I am immersed in suffering, afflicted by suffering. Perhaps an ending of this entire mass of suffering can be discerned.”[148] As one who has gone forth from the household life into homelessness, it would not be proper for me to seek out sensual pleasures similar to or worse than those that I have discarded.’He then reflects thus: ‘Energy will be aroused in me without slackening; mindfulness will be established without confusion; my body will be tranquil without disturbance; my mind will be concentrated and one-pointed.’Having taken himself as his authority, he abandons the unwholesome and develops the wholesome; he abandons what is blameworthy and develops what is blameless; he maintains himself in purity. This is called oneself as one’s authority.

 




 

As one who has gone forth from the household life into homelessness, I might think sensual thoughts, thoughts of ill will, or thoughts of harming. But the abode of the world is vast. In the vast abode of the world there are ascetics and brahmins with psychic potency and the divine eye who know the minds of others. They see things from a distance but they are not themselves seen even when they’re close; they know the minds [of others] with their own mind. They would know me thus: “Look at this clansman: though he has gone forth from the household life into homelessness out of faith, he is tarnished by bad unwholesome states.”There are deities, too, with psychic potency and the divine eye who know the minds of others. They see even from a distance but are not seen themselves even when close; they too know the minds [of others] with their own mind. They too would know me thus: “Look at this clansman: though he has gone forth from the household life into homelessness out of faith, he is tarnished by bad unwholesome states.”’He then reflects thus: ‘Energy will be aroused in me [149] without slackening; mindfulness will be established without confusion; my body will be tranquil without disturbance; my mind will be concentrated and one-pointed.’

 




 

AN 3.40 Authorities :
“These, bhikkhus, are the three authorities.”For one performing an evil deed there is no place in the world called “hidden.”The self within you knows, O person, whether it is true or false. 400 Indeed, sir, you the witness despise your good self; you conceal the evil self existing within yourself. 401 [150] The devas and Tathāgatas see the fool acting unrighteously in the world. Therefore one should fare mindfully, taking oneself as authority; alert and meditative, taking the world as authority; and fare in accordance with the Dhamma, taking the Dhamma as authority. Truly exerting himself, a sage does not decline. Having vanquished Māra and overcome the end-maker, the striver has finished with birth. Such a sage, wise, a world-knower, identifies with nothing at all. 402

400 Attā te purisa jānāti saccaṃ vā yadi vā musā. Mp: “You yourself know, of whatever you do, whether it is of this or that nature. For this reason, it should be understood that, for one who does an evil deed, there is no place in the world that can be called ‘hidden.’”

 




 

“Therefore, bhikkhus, you should train yourselves thus: ‘We will have a keen desire to undertake the training in the higher virtuous behavior; we will have a keen desire to undertake the training in the higher mind; we will have a keen desire to undertake the training in the higher wisdom.’ It is in this way that you should train yourselves.”

 




 

82 (2) The Donkey518

“Bhikkhus, suppose a donkey was following right behind a herd of cattle, [thinking]: ‘I’m a cow too, I’m a cow too.’519 (1) But his appearance would not be like that of the cows, (2) his braying would not be like that of the cows, and (3) his footprint would not be like that of the cows. Yet he follows right behind a herd of cattle, [thinking]: ‘I’m a cow too, I’m a cow too.’“So too, a bhikkhu might be following right behind the Saṅgha of bhikkhus, [thinking]: ‘I’m a bhikkhu too, I’m a bhikkhu too.’(1) But his desire to undertake the training in the higher virtuous behavior is not like that of the other bhikkhus; (2) his desire to undertake the training in the higher mind is not like that of the other bhikkhus; (3) his desire to undertake the training in the higher wisdom is not like that of the other bhikkhus. Yet he follows right behind the Saṅgha of bhikkhus, [thinking]: ‘I’m a bhikkhu too, I’m a bhikkhu too.’“Therefore, bhikkhus, you should train yourselves thus: ‘We will have a keen desire to undertake the training in the higher virtuous behavior; we will have a keen desire to undertake the training in the higher mind; we will have a keen desire to undertake the training in the higher wisdom.’It is in this way that you should train yourselves.”

 




 

“Bhante, every half-month more than a hundred and fifty training rules come up for recitation. I cannot train in them.”“Can you train in the three trainings, bhikkhu: the training in the higher virtuous behavior, the training in the higher mind, and the training in the higher wisdom?”“I can, Bhante.”“Therefore, bhikkhu, train in the three trainings: the training in the higher virtuous behavior, the training in the higher mind, and the training in the higher wisdom. As you train in them, you will abandon lust, hatred, and delusion. With the abandoning of lust, hatred, and delusion, you will do nothing unwholesome or resort to anything bad.”

 




 

(1) “And what, bhikkhus , is the assembly of the foremost? Here, in this kind of assembly the elder bhikkhus do not become luxurious and lax, but discard backsliding and take the lead in solitude; they arouse energy for the attainment of the as-yet-unattained, for the achievement of the as-yet-unachieved, for the realization of the as-yet-unrealized. [Those in] the next generation follow their example. They too do not become luxurious and lax, but discard backsliding and take the lead in solitude; they too arouse energy for the attainment of the as-yet-unattained, for the achievement of the as-yet-unachieved, for the realization of the as-yet-unrealized. This is called the assembly of the foremost.

 




 

“So too, bhikkhus, when a bhikkhu is devoted to the higher mind, (1) there are in him gross defilements: bodily, verbal, and mental misconduct. An earnest, capable bhikkhu abandons, dispels, terminates, and obliterates them. When this has been done, (2) there remain in him middling defilements: sensual thoughts, thoughts of ill will, and thoughts of harming. An earnest, capable bhikkhu abandons, dispels, terminates, and obliterates them. When this has been done, (3) there remain in him subtle defilements: thoughts about his relations, 556 thoughts about his country, and thoughts about his reputation. 557 An earnest, capable bhikkhu abandons, dispels, terminates, and obliterates them. When this has been done, then there remain thoughts connected with the Dhamma. 558

That concentration is not peaceful and sublime, not gained by full tranquilization, 559 not attained to unification, but is reined in and checked by forcefully suppressing [the defilements]. 560 “But, bhikkhus, there comes a time when his mind becomes internally steady, composed, unified, and concentrated. That concentration is peaceful and sublime, gained by full tranquilization, and attained to unification; it is not reined in and checked by forcefully suppressing [the defilements]. 561 Then, there being a suitable basis, he is capable of realizing any state realizable by direct knowledge toward which he might incline his

 




“So too, when a bhikkhu is devoted to the higher mind, from time to time he should give attention to three marks. From time to time he should give attention to the mark of concentration, from time to time to the mark of exertion, and from time to time to the mark of equanimity. “If a bhikkhu devoted to the higher mind attends exclusively to the mark of concentration, [258] it is possible that his mind will veer toward laziness. If he attends exclusively to the mark of exertion, it is possible that his mind will veer toward restlessness. If he attends exclusively to the mark of equanimity, it is possible that his mind will not be properly concentrated for the destruction of the taints. But when from time to time he gives attention to the mark of concentration, from time to time to the mark of exertion, and from time to time to the mark of equanimity, his mind becomes malleable, wieldy, and luminous, not brittle but properly concentrated for the destruction of the taints. Then, there being a suitable basis, he is capable of realizing any state realizable by direct knowledge toward which he might incline his mind.

 




 

AN 3.107 (5) Wailing

“Bhikkhus, (1) in the Noble One’s discipline, singing is wailing. (2) In the Noble One’s discipline, dancing is madness. (3) In the Noble One’s discipline, to laugh excessively, displaying one’s teeth, is childishness. Therefore, bhikkhus, in regard to singing and dancing [let there be] the demolition of the bridge. When you smile rejoicing in the Dhamma, you may simply show a smile.




 

(3) “And what is mental purity? 583 Here, when there is sensual desire in him, a bhikkhu understands: ‘There is sensual desire in me’; or when there is no sensual desire in him, he understands: ‘There is no sensual desire in me’; and he also understands how unarisen sensual desire arises, how arisen sensual desire is abandoned, and how abandoned sensual desire does not arise again in the future.

 




 

“Here, a bhikkhu dwells in dependence on a certain village or town. A householder or a householder’s son approaches him and invites him for the next day’s meal. If he wishes, the bhikkhu accepts. When the night has passed, in the morning the bhikkhu dresses, takes his bowl and robe, and goes to the residence of that householder or householder’s son. He sits down in the seat that has been prepared and that householder or householder’s son, with his own hand, serves and satisfies him with various kinds of delicious food. (1) It does not occur to him: ‘How good, indeed, that this householder [275] or householder’s son, with his own hand, serves and satisfies me with various kinds of delicious food!’(2) It also does not occur to him: ‘Oh, in the future too may this householder or householder’s son, with his own hand, serve and satisfy me with a similar variety of delicious food!’(3) He uses that food without being tied to it, infatuated with it, and blindly absorbed in it, but seeing the danger in it and understanding the escape from it. He thinks thoughts of renunciation in relation to it; he thinks thoughts of good will; he thinks thoughts of non-harming. What is given to such a bhikkhu, I say, is of great fruit.

 




 

“Bhikkhus, wherever bhikkhus take to arguing and quarreling and fall into a dispute, stabbing each other with piercing words, I am uneasy even about directing my attention there, let alone about going there. I conclude about them: ‘Surely , those venerable ones have abandoned three things and cultivated three [other] things.’“What are the three things they have abandoned ? Thoughts of renunciation, thoughts of good will, and thoughts of non-harming. These are the three things they have abandoned.

 




 

IV. A WARRIOR 133 (1) A Warrior

“Bhikkhus, possessing three factors, a warrior is worthy of a king, an accessory of a king, and reckoned a factor of kingship. What three? Here, a warrior is a long-distance shooter, a sharp-shooter, and one who splits a great body. Possessing these three factors, a warrior is worthy of a king, an accessory of a king, and reckoned a factor of kingship. So too, possessing three factors, a bhikkhu is worthy of gifts, worthy of hospitality, worthy of offerings, worthy of reverential salutation, an unsurpassed field of merit for the world. What three? Here, a bhikkhu is a long-distance shooter, a sharp-shooter, and one who splits a great body. (1) “And how is a bhikkhu a long-distance shooter? Here, any kind of form whatsoever—whether past, future, or present, internal or external, gross or subtle, inferior or superior, far or near—a bhikkhu sees all form as it really is with correct wisdom thus: ‘This is not mine, this I am not, this is not my self.’Any kind of feeling whatsoever …[285] …Any kind of perception whatsoever …Any kind of volitional activities whatsoever …Any kind of consciousness whatsoever—whether past, future, or present, internal or external, gross or subtle, inferior or superior, far or near—a bhikkhu sees all consciousness as it really is with correct wisdom thus: ‘This is not mine, this I am not, this is not my self.’It is in this way that a bhikkhu is a long-distance shooter. (2) “And how is a bhikkhu a sharp-shooter? Here, a bhikkhu understands as it really is: ‘This is suffering.’He understands as it really is: ‘This is the origin of suffering.’He understands as it really is: ‘This is the cessation of suffering.’He understands as it really is: ‘This is the way leading to the cessation of suffering.’It is in this way that a bhikkhu is a sharp-shooter. (3) “And how is a bhikkhu one who splits a great body? Here, a bhikkhu splits the great mass of ignorance. It is in this way that a bhikkhu is one who splits a great body. “Possessing these three qualities, a bhikkhu is worthy of gifts, worthy of hospitality, worthy of offerings, worthy of reverential salutation, an unsurpassed field of merit for the world.”

 




 

135 (3) A Friend “Bhikkhus, one should associate with a friend who possesses three factors. What three? (1) Here, a bhikkhu gives what is hard to give. (2) He does what is hard to do. (3) He patiently endures what is hard to endure. One should associate with a friend who possesses these three factors.”

 




 

11 (1) Walking639

(1) “Bhikkhus, if a sensual thought, a thought of ill will, or a thought of harming arises in a bhikkhu while walking, and he tolerates it, does not abandon it, dispel it, terminate it, and obliterate it, then that bhikkhu is said to be devoid of ardor and moral dread; he is constantly and continuously lazy and lacking in energy while walking. (2) “If a sensual thought …arises in a bhikkhu while standing …(3) If a sensual thought …arises in a bhikkhu while sitting …(4) If a sensual thought, a thought of ill will, or a thought of harming arises in a bhikkhu while wakefully lying down, and he tolerates it, does not abandon it, dispel it, terminate it, and obliterate it, then that bhikkhu is said to be devoid of ardor and moral dread; he is constantly and continuously lazy and lacking in energy while wakefully lying down. (1) “But, bhikkhus, if a sensual thought, a thought of ill will, or a thought of harming arises in a bhikkhu while walking, and he does not tolerate it but abandons it, dispels it, terminates it, and obliterates it, then that bhikkhu is said to be ardent and to dread wrongdoing; he is constantly and continuously energetic and resolute while walking.

Whether walking or standing, sitting or lying down, one who thinks bad thoughts connected with the household life has entered upon a dire path, infatuated by delusive things: such a bhikkhu cannot reach the highest enlightenment. But one who, whether walking, standing, sitting, or lying down, has calmed his thoughts and delights in the stilling of thought: a bhikkhu such as this can reach the highest enlightenment.